• Wildlife

    by
    oco
    Published on 03-29-2011 05:51 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Wildlife
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    Bears have been part of the greater Yellowstone ecological system for thousands of years. Black bears evolved from bears that traveled to North America from Asia 7 to 8 million years ago. Their ability to eat a wide range of foods allowed them to survive the last ice age. Yellowstone is only one of the forested areas of North America inhabited by black bears. The grizzly bear, a subspecies of brown bear called “grizzled”, meaning gray, for the tips of its fur, is thought to be descended from the Ussuri brown bears that crossed from Asia to Alaska 50,000 to 100,000 years ago. They probably migrated ...
    by
    oco
    Published on 03-29-2011 12:54 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Wildlife
    content/attachments/51-800px-yellowstone-wolf-17120.jpg.html


    The first gray wolf, Canis lupus, is thought to have migrated to North America from Asia about 750,000 years ago, long before mankind arrived around 18,000 years ago. Wolves at one time ranged over most of North America north of Mexico City. Lewis and Clark reported the gray wolf, which they described as the “large wolf” to distinguish it from coyotes, as “very numerous”, feeding on bison and wild turkeys and howling through the night. Due to increasing human habitation and agriculture, wolves’ numbers have been drastically reduced. Now there ...
    by
    oco
    Published on 03-29-2011 10:58 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Wildlife
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    An ecosystem is defined as a community of organisms and their environment, interacting physically, chemically, and in regard to energy. The Yellowstone ecosystem includes living animals from bison and grizzly bears to microscopic thermophiles and a physical environment that includes a giant live volcano over a huge reservoir of molten rock, mountain ranges, high plateaus, lakes, rivers and river valleys covering over 18 million acres of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, forming an area roughly the size of West Virginia. It is one of the largest wild temperate zone ecosystems on the planet.

    The smallest living things in Yellowstone are the most recently discovered. In 1966 Dr. Thomas Brock discovered ...
    by
    oco
    Published on 02-09-2011 05:47 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Hiking,
    3. Wildlife,
    4. Mountains
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    Washburn Mountain is one of the most enjoyable places in Yellowstone Park. From the summit, 10,223 feet high, hikers can see a spectacular 360 degree panorama of the whole park, the Grand Teton Mountains, Mount Holmes and even Old Faithful’s eruptions during clear weather. Mount Washburn Trail provides wonderful views of scenery, wildflowers and animals. A variety of life is seen in 5 life zones, from the Upper Sonoran zone at the foot of the mountain through the Canadian, Hudsonian, and Sub-Alpine zone to the Alpine zone ...
    by
    oco
    Published on 11-30-2010 02:39 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Hiking,
    3. Wildlife,
    4. Lakes
    content/attachments/39-3656909751_03a8eabfa4.jpg.html


    Trout Lake in Yellowstone is a beautiful lake located near the Northeast Entrance to Yellowstone. The lake has been known by several names over the years, including Fish Lake and Soda Butte Lake, but is now officially known as Trout Lake. The hike to the lake is about a half mile long, dirt, and very steep in a few spots, but a relatively easy trail. Small children can easily make the hike, and will thoroughly enjoy walking around the lake when they reach the top of the trail. A small parking area is available at the trail head on the north side ...
    by
    oco
    Published on 11-10-2010 01:19 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Wildlife,
    3. History
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    The summer of 1988 was a dry one in Yellowstone National Park. In July, the park had the least amount of precipitation on record, and the trees and brush, normally wet enough not to ignite, suffered fires from lightning and human carelessness. More than 150,000 acres were burned on the worst day, 20 August 1988. Originally over 793,000 acres accounting for 36 percent of the park, were estimated as burned in 50 different fires. More recent and accurate GIS mapping has increased this to 1.1 million acres which is almost half of the park. Almost one million
    ...
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